.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Neighbors

  • A Kentucky Proud yard

    The temperatures may be rising into the nineties this week but Joan Brown, known to many locals as the Road Kill Chef, isn’t slowing down in her garden.

    “Sometimes I have to tell myself, Joan slow down you can’t work like you used to,” she said with a smile.

    But those years of hard work are being recognized.

  • Meat your neighbor

    Meat is probably the least transparent business on earth. 

    Our desire for cheap meat has created an industrial system that sates the American appetite of an estimated 200 pounds of meat per person each year.  That’s about twice the global average.  Plus, we seem to know very little about something we eat an awful lot. 

    The industrial meat business is predominately a closed system that takes place behind gated complexes, far from the potential consumer. 

  • Graduation 2014

    Graduation Day 2014 was Saturday and Shelby's seniors celebrated with joys and tears.

  • A rick a day keeps the doctor away

    Headline

     

     

    By Lisa King

    Traveling north on Todds Point Road, just before you get deep into the country, there is a large woodpile on the east side of the road. Roughly the size of the modest house and three greenhouses it surrounds, the woodpile seems to be way too much to heat a home, especially as we turn the corner into spring and summer.

    So what’s the purpose of such a massive amount of wood? Well, Kenneth Terrell will tell you, if you have a few minutes to listen to his tale.

  • Bunny Days

    Though Saturday dawned cool and cloudy, the sound of children’s laughter at Red Orchard Park warmed the souls of those in attendance for Bunny Days.

    Shelby County Parks and Recreation Director Shawn Pickens glanced around at the 200 children and adults who bundled up against chilly morning temperatures to hunt eggs and find prizes.

    “We’re down a little from last year, because it’s so cool, but all in all, I think it’s going really well,” he said.

  • Home on the range

    If the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, then Cherry Settle must have a claim on her husband Tommy’s heart for the next millennium.

    The couple’s beautiful 144-year-old antebellum-style home on Shelbyville Road, where they have resided for the past four decades and raised their two children, Jennifer and Tommy Jr., was the former residence of Col. Harland Sanders and his wife, Claudia.

    And while changes occur over forty years, the Settles could never change one thing that helped launch an American icon.

  • This grandma is a big game hunter

    The wind in her hair, with sounds of the most dangerous animals on earth roaring in her ears on the plains of Africa, Marty Mason of Bagdad has proven time and again why she ranked among the top five in the international Extreme Huntress competition last year.

    Her home in Bagdad, where she lives with her husband, Bob, features a trophy room the couple built after they discovered the joys of big-game hunting in Africa in 2008, and the walls are adorned with dozens of trophies from zebra to hippo to antelope.

  • A night for lovers of animals

    For the fourth year in a row, animal lovers turned out in droves to pack Claudia Sanders Dinner House to raise money for animals.

    “Are we sold out – are you kidding?” said Kate Raisor, glancing around at the horde of 350-plus patrons, mostly decked out in various hues of red, pink and black, milling around the banquet room Friday night.

  • Behind Shelby's doors: A diamond in the rough

    From the time she saw the house, Pat Hornback knew, she said, that it was something that would be perfect, but that took some convincing.

    “I wanted to run a bulldozer through it, but she didn’t,” said her husband, Paul Hornback. “Pat is very good at looking at something and being able to see what it will look like when it’s finished. I couldn’t see it, but she knew it was going to be something special.”

  • 50 ways to raise awareness

    Paul Erway has been racing his wheelchair in marathons since the early 1990s, and he even competed for a spot in the Paralympics. But he said nothing really prepared him for what he went through this year, especially in November.

    On Nov. 16-17 Erway traveled more than 3,150 miles – hitting races in Wilmington, Del., Philadelphia and Las Vegas.

    And although Wilmington’s run wasn’t a fully sanctioned race, the other two were.