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Neighbors

  • Downsizing for life

    Randall Stivers took a long drink of his Powerade Zero while pondering the question just put to him – How did he maintain the willpower to loss a third of his body weight in less than a year? 

    “Life,” he said simply, his eyes – usually full of laughter – candid and somber.  “I wanted to live. I wanted to be there for my kids. I don’t want to go back there – I don’t want to go down that path again.” 

  • A heart for children

    Children can tug at your heartstrings, especially when they are in need.

    Uganda, located along the equator in eastern Africa, is home to 2.3 million orphans, and two women – a mother and daughter from Shelbyville – are doing what they can to provide for a small fraction of them.

    After a trip to Uganda last year, Hannah Jones and her mother, Linda Jones, came back home determined to make a dream come true for some children in a village near Jinja, 54 miles east of the capitol city of Kampala.

  • Blown away

    When artistic inspiration hit Travis Adams, he didn’t blow off the urge.

    Instead, he ran with it.

    Adams, newly graduated and working in Nashville with a degree in financial economics, came back to Kentucky to pursue his lifelong dream – blowing glass. And now he is preparing for his very first show to display his creations.

  • Shelby County’s 2015 Fabulous 5

     

    The Sentinel-News, since 2008, has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during the year. We sought your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person – or team – selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5, has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

     

     

    Sam Eyle

  • A hobby for the birds

    Mike Harman grinned as he walked back toward his raptor facility in his backyard.

    “I’m known around Shelbyville as the guy with the bird in the car,” he said.

    Stepping inside his workshop, he withdrew a Cooper’s hawk – somewhat unwillingly – from its cage.

  • Flight of fancy

    After a gathering to “break a leg,” calls of “check your costumes, check your props!” echo through the Shelby County Community Theatre as excitement washes over the cast and crew of Footloose like a tangible force.

    “Adding shows gives you that extra little adrenaline rush,” said director Cyndi Skellie, with a breathless laugh as she glanced around as people dashed off in all directions to get into costume and do their hair and makeup.

  • Simpsonville United Methodist celebrates 175 years

    Any entity that can proclaim that they’ve survived nearly two centuries is clearly doing something right.

    But members at Simpsonville United Methodist Church can proudly boast that their church is not just surviving, it is thriving, as this year they celebrate their septaquintaquinquecentennial –yes, you read that right– anniversary.

    “The church is sill here for a reason,” Reverend Richard Holladay said.  “God has not completed his work in and through us.”

  • My Marine Corps Journal 1937-42, Part 6: Chesty Puller Takes a Bride!

    Notes: For original hand-written Journal, see Ronald. R. Van Stockum Papers, The Filson Historical Society. Throughout this series, actual Journal entries will appear in regular type, with my explanations or amplifications in bold enclosed in brackets.

    [I have been surprised to notice that I had neglected to record in my Journal a startling event at the Basic School in November 1937.

  • Gala night for charity

    A nice crowd, delicious food, mellow music and good fellowship made for a very successful annual fundraiser for Operation Care for the third year in a row.

    The Mercy Omega Gala, Saturday night at Claudia Sanders Dinner House, raised more than $30,000 for Mercy Medical Clinic and the Omega House, a women’s shelter, run by Operation Care, said the organization’s executive director, Jeff Johnson.

  • Bad to the bone

    The Shelby County Public Library will be filled with tales of murder, womanizing and drinking Thursday when the infamous Edwin Terrill and Bill Marion ride into town.