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EARLIER: County finishes review of plan

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By Lisa King

After a second workshop, the Shelby County Fiscal Court has finished its review of the Goals and Objectives of the county's new Comprehensive Plan.

After examining the remainder of the document Wednesday night in a meeting with Ryan Libke, executive director of the Triple S Planning Commission, magistrates expressed their satisfaction with their changes and agreed to approve the item at the next Fiscal Court meeting on Tuesday.

Magistrates began their review with the Land Use portion of the document, which included sections on residential, agricultural and commercial land use. In the general Land Use category, magistrates wanted to make sure that the document was worded in such a way as to make it clear that growth would be encouraged in appropriate ways.

"I just want industrial growth to be in industrial areas and residential growth to be in residential areas," magistrate Tony Carriss said.

So Libke agreed to amend section LU-1-6 to add the words in italics to the following sentence: To reduce the cost and impact of development by encouraging growth in directions which most efficiently use the existing and planned utility systems in the urban service area.

Magistrate Michael Riggs was concerned with section LU-1-12, which would give enforcement officers the ability to issue citation when inspecting violations of zoning regulations.

Riggs said he thought a person must be a sworn police officer to issue citations, but Libke said that section just is meant to open up that possibility in the future.

"This is just a planning tool," he said. "We don't do it now, but we want to look at different ways to enforce these. Some cities use a code enforcement  board, and it gives them more bite."

In discussing the Natural/Historic Resources, Carriss said he wanted to make sure that the document would help to protect historic sites in his district.

"It's very important to preserve the many old historic school buildings that we have throughout the county, especially in Mount Eden," he said.  

Libke pointed out that section NH2-3 would accomplish that by reading, "To promote the protection of historic buildings, sites and districts."

In the final category, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger wanted to add terminology to the Economic Development portion of the plan to encompass a wider range of economic potential.

So the following italicized words were added to this sentence: "To adopt an economic development strategy to retain existing industry, commerce, and agriculture, increase economic diversity, and create better employment opportunities in order to ensure that the county remains a vital part of a strong local and regional and global economy.”

Magistrates then pronounced themselves satisfied and agreed to approve the document at their next meeting.

The county will be the last body to adopt the document. The cities of Shelbyville as well as Simpsonville passed it in the first week of August.

     

 County finishes review of Goals and Objectives

Plans to give approval next week

 

By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

 

After a second workshop, the Shelby County Fiscal Court  has finished its review of the Goals and Objectives of the county’s new Comprehensive Plan.

After examining the remainder of the document Wednesday night in a meeting with Ryan Libke, executive director of the Triple S Planning Commission, magistrates expressed their satisfaction with their changes and agreed to approve the item at the next fiscal court meeting scheduled for next week.

Magistrates began their review with the Land Use portion of the document, which included sections on residential, agricultural and commercial land use. In the general Land Use category, magistrates wanted to make sure that the document was worded in such a way as to make it clear that growth would be encouraged in appropriate ways.

“I just want industrial growth to be in industrial areas and residential growth to be in residential areas,” magistrate Tony Carriss said.

So Libke agreed to amend section LU-1-6 to add the words in italics to the following sentence: To reduce the cost and impact of development by encouraging growth in directions which most efficiently use the existing and planned utility systems in the urban service area.

Magistrate Michael Riggs was concerned with section LU-1-12  which will give enforcement officers citation  issuance capabilities when inspecting violations of zoning regulations. Riggs said he thought a person must be a sworn police officer to issue citations, but Libke said that section just is meant to open up that possibility in the future.

“This is just a planning tool,” he said. “We don’t do it now, but we want to look at different ways to enforce these. Some cities use a code enforcement  board and it gives them more bite.”

In discussing the next category, Natural/Historic Resources, Carriss said he wanted to make sure that the G&O would help to protect historic sites in his district.

“It’s very important to preserve the many old historic school buildings that we have throughout the county, especially in Mount Eden,” he said.  

Libke pointed out that section NH2-3 would accomplish that by reading, “To promote the protection of historic buildings, sites and districts.”

In the final category, Shelby County Judge Rob Rothenburger wanted to add terminology to the Economic Development portion of the G&O to encompass a wider range of economic potential.

So the following italicized words were added to this sentence: “To adopt an economic development strategy to retain existing industry, commerce, and agriculture, increase economic diversity, and create better employment opportunities in order to ensure that the county remains a vital part of a strong local and regional and global economy.

Magistrates then pronounced themselves satisfied with the G&O, and agreed to approve the document at the next meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court on Tuesday, Sept. 1 at 7 p.m.

The county will be the last body to adopt the document, as the city of Shelbyville as well as Simpsonville already did so in the first week of August.