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County postpones approval of plan update

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Magistrates say they need time to review

By Lisa King

Shelby County Fiscal Court magistrates voted Tuesday to postpone a first reading to adopt the goals and objectives portion of the county's new Comprehensive Plan.

The consensus of the court, sparked by Magistrate Michael Riggs, is that magistrates did not want to approve the plan because planners had not explained the variances of the document to them.

Riggs said that it was his understanding during a workshop in February with the Triple S Planning and Zoning Commission, which drafted the document, that the commission would consult with magistrates again before submitting the goals and objectives, in order to go over the specifics of the document with them.

Shelby County Attorney Hart Megibben said that Triple S was not required to do that, but Riggs said that even so, the board should have done so.

"That's the whole point of bringing it before three bodies," he said, referring to the Fiscal Court, the Shelbyville City Council and the Simpsonville City Commission.

Ryan Libke, executive director of Triple S, said in response that "we never agreed to meet again," and that the planning commission already had had its public hearings and gathered public input.

Riggs also said he wanted to know in what ways the new goals and objectives would differ from the old ones, Libke said the planning commission didn't feel that was important.

"We didn't feel we had to look back," he said.

Riggs said that the planning commission disregarded magistrates' concerns.

Magistrate Tony Carriss said he agreed with Riggs on the issue and that he had thought that magistrates would have at least received a brief summary of the goals and objectives before the document was submitted for their approval.

"I want the Fiscal Court to have the ability to work with planning and zoning in an agreeable fashion," he said. "If we've got a planning commission that wants to work outside the realm of Fiscal Court, we'll have to address that."

County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger suggested that rather than reject the proposal that action be postponed until magistrates could review it in a workshop, and the magistrates agreed.

A date for the workshop has not been set.

The goals and objectives are set to come before the Simpsonville City Commission on Aug. 4 and the Shelbyville City Council on Aug. 6.

  Sidewalk projects approved  

Riggs also objected to the county's being asked to help pay for a city sidewalk project. Though some of the other magistrates shared his concern, his was the only dissenting vote on a sidewalk that would cover 920 feet along Mount Eden Road, from Weissinger Estates to Fairway Crossing.

The cost of the project is to be split three ways by the city, county and the Weissinger Estates Neighborhood Association at the cost of $4,000 each.

Rothenburger said that even the sidewalk would be located within city jurisdiction, it would be employed by all residents. Magistrate Mike Whitehouse agreed, saying that, "The main issue is public safety."

"That's a noble idea, but a lot of areas need sidewalks, especially in Simpsonville," Riggs said.

He added that he was opposed to the county’s helping out with the project because if it did, he thinks the city would start asking for help with other projects.

"This will set a precedent," he said.

Then Carriss suggested that the county be very selective in the future in helping out with city sidewalk projects.

But Riggs said, "You can't pick and choose if we've got the money, and I didn't know we did, that's news to me."

Right after that project was approved, magistrates approved a bid for the Waddy Sidewalk Project.

That sidewalk, which had previously been approved, will run south from Kings Highway almost to the Waddy Post Office, for 354 feet, Road Department Supervisor Carl Henry said.

Henry added that two bids were received for the project and recommended that magistrates accept the lower of the two, from Gra-Kat for $6,165, which they did.

  Address ordinance passes first reading  

Magistrates also approved the first reading of an ordinance requiring house numbers to be more visible. The "Addressing Ordinance," which was revised from the original ordinance passed in 1990, was submitted by the E-911 Board two weeks ago.

The ordinance would require addresses to be posted in numerals 4 to 6 inches in height made of reflective material or in a color that contrasts with the color of the mailbox or on the house. Also, the address must be posted on both sides of the mailbox.

The reason behind the revision is so that emergency services personnel can find addresses more quickly. The ordinance is also designed to provide a uniform system for displaying addresses.

  Other agenda items    

• Approval of the second reading of an ordinance relating to special districts.

• Approval of the first reading of an ordinance relating to Flood Damage Prevention.

• Approval of the following personnel items: Linzie Craig to the PVA Board of Tax and Appeals Commission; Mike Yount as part-time maintenance technician at $10 per hour; and Jimmy Lyon as temporary full-time laborer for the road department at $10 per hour.

• Acceptance of the 2009-10 South Oldham Fire Protection District budget.

• Approval to install two fire hydrants at the cost of $5,700 on Ky. 395 between I-64 and Fairview Drive.

• Approval of the updated Shelby County EMS Standard Operating Guidelines.

• Approval of request of $500 for the First Annual Clay Village October Fest.

• Approval of request of $2,000 for the Shelbyville Horse Show.

• Approval of request of $500 for the Simpsonville Fall Festival.

• Approval of $2,500 for the Painted Stone Settlers/Long Run Massacre Reenactment.County postpones approval of Goals and Objectives

Magistrates need time to review

By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

Shelby County Fiscal Court magistrates voted Tuesday to postpone a first reading to adopt the Goals and Objectives of the county’s new Comprehensive Plan.

Goals and Objectives postponed

The general concensus of the court, sparked by magistrate Michael Riggs, is that they did not want to approve the plan because they were not consulted about its contents beforehand by planners.

Riggs said that it was his understanding during a workshop in February with the Triple S Planning and Zoning Commission, which drafted the document, that the commission would consult with magistrates again before submitting the Goals and Objectives, in order to go over the specifics of the document with them.

Shelby County Attorney Hart Megibben said that Triple S was not required to do that, but Riggs said that even so, they should have done so.

“That’s the whole point of bringing it before three bodies,” he said, referring to the fiscal court, Shelbyville City Council and the Simpsonville City Commission.

Ryan Libke, executive director of Triple S, said in response that “We never agreed to meet again,” and that the planning commission had already had its public hearings and gathered public input.

Riggs also said he wanted to know in what ways the new goals and objectives would differ from the old ones, Libke said the planning commission didn’t feel that was important.

“We didn’t feel we had to look back,” he said.

Riggs said that the planning commission disregarded magistrates’ concerns.

Magistrate Tony Carriss said he was on the same page as Riggs on the issue and that he had thought that magistrates would have at least received a brief summary of the goals and objectives before the document was submitted for their approval. He echoed Riggs’ displeasure at the planning commissions’ actions.

“I want the fiscal court to have the ability to work with planning and zoning in an agreeable fashion,” he said. “If we’ve got a planning commission that wants to work outside the realm of fiscal court, we’ll have to address that.”

County Judge Rob Rothenburger suggested that rather than reject the proposal, that it be postponed until magistrates could review it in a workshop, and the magistrates agreed.

A date for the workshop has not yet been set.

The goals and objectives are set to come before the Shelbyville City Council on Aug. 6 and the Simpsonville City Commission on Aug. 4.

Sidewalk projects approved

Riggs also objected to the county’s being asked to help pay for a city sidewalk project.

But though some of the other magistrates shared his concern, his was the only dissenting vote, as the matter was approved 5-1.

The sidewalk is proposed to run for a distance of 920 feet from Weissenger Estates to Fairway Crossing.

The cost of the project is to be split three ways by the city, county and the Weissenger Estates Neighborhood Association at the cost of $4,000 each.

Rothenburger said that even the sidewalk would be located within city jurisdiction, it would be employed by all residents. Magistrate Mike Whitehouse agreed, saying that, “The main issue is public safety.”

“That’s a noble idea, but a lot of areas need sidewalks, especially in Simpsonville,” Riggs said.

He added that he was opposed to the county helping out with the project because if they did, he thinks the city would start asking for help with other projects.

“This will set a precedent,” he said.

Then Carris suggested that the county be very selective in the future in helping out with city sidewalk projects.

But Riggs said, “You can’t pick and choose if we’ve got the money, and I didn’t know we did, that’s news to me.”

Right after that project was approved, magistrates approved a bid for the Waddy Sidewalk Project.

That sidewalk, which had previously been approved, will run from Kings Highway southward almost to the Waddy post office, said Road Department Supervisor Carl Henry, for a distance of 354 feet.

Henry added that two bids were received for the project, and recommended that magistrates accept the lower of the two, from Gra-Kat for $6,165, which they did.

Address ordinance passes first reading

Magistrates also approved the first reading of an ordinance requiring house numbers to be more visible. The “Addressing Ordinance,” which was revised from the original ordinance passed in 1990, was submitted by the E-911 Board two weeks ago.

The ordinance will require addresses to be posted in numerals 4 to 6 inches in height made of reflective material or in a color that contrasts with the color of the mailbox or on the house. Also, the address must be posted on both sides of the mailbox.

The reason behind the revision is so that emergency services personnel can find addresses more quickly. The ordinance is also designed to provide a uniform system for displaying addresses.

Other agenda items

Other items on the agenda included the following:

• Approval of the second reading of an ordinance relating to special districts

• Approval of the first reading of an ordinance relating to Flood Damage Prevention

• Approval of the following personnel items: Linzie Craig to the PVA Board of Tax and Appeals Commission; Mike Young as part-time maintenance technician at $10 per hour; and Jimmy Lyon as temporary full-time laborer for the road department at $10 per hour

 • Acceptance of the 2009-10 South Oldham Fire Protection District budget

• Approval to install two fire hydrants at the cost of $5,700 on Ky. 395 between I-64 and Fairview Drive

• Approval of the updated Shelby County EMS Standard Operating Guidelines

• Approval of request of $500 for the First Annual Clay Village October Fest

• Approval of request of $2,000 for the Shelbyville Horse Show

• Approval of request of $500 for the Simpsonville Fall Festival

• Approval of $2,500 for the Painted Stone Settlers/Long Run Massacre Re-enactment